A recent article in the Guardian (Hospitals without Walls: The Future of Healthcare) explores the changes in healthcare delivery caused by the pandemic. It describes a future where care is decentralised, as it moves away from hospital settings. A move ushered in through the increased use of digital tools, such as telehealth video consultations, and other tools such a messaging services. All of which find new ways to connect those needing care to those who can give care.

As a side note, What was also a fascinating read is the account of the evolution of hospital architecture in response to…


TL;DR — Teams rush to build ‘low hanging fruit’, features they think will benefit users but also make them feel their achieving things. However, this is a mistaken belief that outputs equate to outcomes. It's just as fast if you find the areas of highest value to your users and start by immediately delivering a small slice of that. You’ll end up delivering software just as quickly, but it will be a small slice of something great, not a whole piece of some insignificant feature.

Photo by 44 Degrees North on Unsplash

This was originally a presentation I made to several design teams, describing the benefit of moving away from delivering product features and towards addressing the most impactful user issues that we were finding in our research. It was a reaction to managing several design teams that often had their goal post’s moved during the year. I felt there were growing frustrations from teams that were struggling to make things they felt were valuable.

In this changeable environment, they looked for ways they could quickly feel the glow of satisfaction when progress is being achieved. Combined with a changeable company strategy…


Photo by Céline Haeberly on Unsplash

I have worked as a digital designer since graduation. Amassing 20 years ago in an industry that has seen my work range from advertising, to products, from small boutique agencies to large global organisations.

To some extent, everyone dreams of what they might do differently. What they would have done if they had had the time again, with more information, and a different approach. What paths would I have taken? And of those choices made, how would I have then executed differently? These are pieces of advice, written to my younger self, at the point where I have just graduated…


If you view Data as a product, then we can ask product questions. Questions that help us to see the impact of our work, measure outcomes, and continually improve it over time. Jeff Gothelf recently looked at the application of product thinking for teams who work in areas such as HR. It also applies to data and business intelligence.

I have started a new role, working with health data scientists and BI engineers, and even though this is an area I have had less experience, I am seeing many of the same things (as well as the lack of the…


Seeing someone do something is ok. Knowing why is invaluable.

Why?

This super simple question underpins everything that I do as a product designer because it clarifies what matters. It gives an extra gear to your research because it arms you with a tool. A tool that makes you an active participant in a discussion. And in the messy world of qualitative research, being an active participant, guiding the conversation to what you want to know; asking why is one of the best ways to get to the nub of anything.

I use why all the time, people talk about…


Let’sTalk is a conceptual future direction for a web based service that looks to improve clinical encounters. My belief is that better preparation clinic would improve how people with diabetes engage with their care. It may help build the relationship between a person with diabetes, and their care team, and address issues around the power balance between a patient and clinician.

People with diabetes are experts in their condition, but there is a tendency for clinics to focus on key metrics like blood glucose levels to assess management. As an avenue for recording issues, Let’sTalk supports collaborative encounters around…


This is part of my MRES dissertation. This may be incomplete, poorly cited (at this stage). But forms part of a writing discipline attached to design research.

Broadly speaking, I engaged in a largely ethnographic approach to researching transitional care for people with T1D. To build empathy, it is my belief that research must look beyond design discourse for inspiration and create work that responds to the contemporary sociological, psychological, or ecological environment.

As a designer, one of the many challenges of research in healthcare is you are unlikely to have first hand experience of the condition. Such as direct…


I am blogging my MRES. This may be incomplete, poorly cited (at this stage). But forms part of a writing discipline attached to design research. This post is part 3 of the thematic analysis done after the semi-structured interviews. (read the overview of thematic analysis here). Read about Parents of people with T1D here. Read about Health Care Professionals here.

Through thematic grouping of data, a number of themes emerged. These management of the condition, especially around how they engaged with clinical staff in a clinical setting.

Feeling inadequate for poor management

Trying to live up to the idea of…


I am blogging my MRES. This may be incomplete, poorly cited (at this stage). But forms part of a writing discipline attached to design research. This post shows the evolution of a co-design workshop from a joint activity to a game.

Spring-boarding from the semi-structured interviews. I developed a workshop looking at clinical conversations and how they might be improved. By focusing on theses exchanges, I wanted to research through design how, on a micro-level, the different actors within transitional care (Patients, HCP’s and Parents) relate.

A service design analysis of transition may uncover aspects of the interaction between these…


I am blogging my MRES. This may be incomplete, poorly cited (at this stage). But forms part of a writing discipline attached to design research. This post shows the evolution of a co-design workshop from a joint activity to a game.

Spring-boarding from the semi-structured interviews. I developed a workshop looking at clinical conversations and how they might be improved. By focusing on theses exchanges, I wanted to research through design how, on a micro-level, the different actors within transitional care (Patients, HCP’s and Parents) relate.

A service design analysis of transition may uncover aspects of the interaction between these…

Tim Allan

Fmr: Design Manager for clinical care @ Babylon. Fmr Lead Design/research in Urgent & Emergency Care at NHS.uk. RCA MRES in Healthcare & Design.

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